Wednesday, December 11, 2013

PLN 10:

"You'll Never Learn"
Students can't resist multitasking and it's impairing their memory.

By Annie Murphy Paul

http://cdn.creativeguerrillamarketing.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/social-media-hand.jpeg

Summary:

Annie Murphy Paul’s “You’ll Never Learn!” informs the reader that students are multitasking now and it is harming their ability to learn.  Paul opens her article with some research done by investigators from California State University, who wrote down a check list of what students did while attending class.  These activities included: e-mail, texting, instant messaging, Facebook, watching Television, and other doings.  Using this, she goes into how students who multitask end up with shallow learning and poorer results than students who give the homework their full attention.  Paul correspondingly uses scientific research to support her article saying that tasks such as doing Facebook and homework is very demanding and both activities use the same area of the brain.  Paul also documented negative outcomes from multitasking such as: assignments take longer to complete, the mental fatigue leads to more mistakes, memory will be impaired, and grades are affected negatively.  This article expresses that students are being affected deleteriously through the use of modern technology at their disposal.


Summary Response:

               Annie Murphy Paul’s “You’ll Never Learn!” elucidates how students are multitasking more and this is affecting their grades and education.  A student’s grades are affected by effort.  If a student multitasks, then according to the article, “their learning is far spottier and shallower than if the work had their full attention.”  So if a student wants to improve their grade, they should focus more stalwartly on their homework.  Student’s education is affected by the mental strain of multitasking since “memory of what they’re working on will be impaired…research has suggested that when we’re distracted, our brains actually process and store information in different, less useful ways…media multitasking while learning is negatively associated with students’ grades.”  So multitasking while learning supports theories about how students’ grades and education can be negatively affected. Paul’s “You’ll Never Learn!” presents evidence that students are multitasking more, and that this multitasking is detrimental to learning.

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

PLN 8 Redo:

Summary:

Ron Clark’s “What Teachers Really Want to tell Parents” describes how teachers are feeling threatened as parents’ protectiveness of their kids grow.  Clark states a starling fact that the average educator teaches only 4.5 years, and many of them say that dealing with parents is one reason they quit.  As a teacher himself, Clark lists ten things teachers want parents to know.  The list includes: teachers are educators, not nannies, trust the teachers, and stop making excuses for the child so they can learn to be successful.  The next set of things He also wants the parents to help the teacher instead of prosecuting them, do not complain about bad grades because the teachers that give low grades often are the better teachers, teachers and staff are living of fear of what the parents could do to them, and teachers want the parents to deal with negative situations in a professional manner. Clark is trying to raise parental awareness about teachers becoming more threatened due to parents’ protectiveness and Clark wants parents to change their behavior.

Summary Response:

Ron Clark’s “What Teachers Really Want to tell Parents” explains that parents are becoming too over protective of their child and teachers are feeling threatened by the parents, which is extremely bad because it affects kids’ education.  In the article, Clark gives an example of a child that was cheating on a test, and the parents claimed the teacher was labeling the child as a criminal.  Clark writes “…principals all across the country are telling me that more and more lawyers are accompanying parents for school meetings dealing with their children.”  This shows that parents are looking for better grades but when a child is accused of getting a bad grade in a class, they blame the teacher even if the grade was appropriate.  Another example Clark cited was when a teacher tried to help get a red mark off the side of a student’s face, but it was still there when he got home.  The parents called the media, and the teacher lost her job for something so trivial.  Just think, if a teacher could get his or her life ruined from something so trivial, then could they be fired for any reason?  Clark is also a teacher and suggests parents are immature, and tells them to deal with this in a professional manner and not just jump to conclusions.  Teachers are being threatened so much due to parents over protectiveness of their child that mean good teachers are quitting.  This trend threatens the quality of education.  As time goes on, teachers are becoming more and more threatened by parents due to parents’ over protectiveness.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

PLN 9: "Schools Would be Great if it Weren't for the Kids"

"Schools Would be Great if it Weren't for the Kids"
Alfie Kohn and Valerie Strauss


Summary:


Alfie Kohn’s “Schools Would be Great if it Weren’t for the Kids” describes how kids can be motivated by nontraditional ways of teaching school.  Kohn criticizes Robert J. Samuelson’s column about reforming schools by offering better salaries to teachers and the use of “positive reinforcement  and punitive consequences” for students.  Kohn’s article rejected Samuelson’s ideas for school reform, and instead said that school reform should be based on the idea that schools should change how classroom’s function to make the learning interesting and make kids motivated to do better.  Kohn says traditional schooling methods are causing kids to become less motivated to learn, and the best idea is to change things in the classroom to make learning fun and meaningful for kids.


Summary Response:
Alfie Kohn’s “Schools Would be Great if it Weren't for the kids” elucidates how kids are becoming less motivated in school under traditional teaching methods, and the best idea to change this is by changing how classroom’s work.  If a kid is bored, he or she tends to not pay attention and does not hear important things.  This causes students to be less motivated in school.  Kohn suggests that kids have also lost “the hunger to make sense of things, with which all children start out.” He also reflects on how kids are losing the fire that they have to learn new things.  He says teaching of students today “reflects a problem with what, and how, they’re being taught, or the extent to which they've been excluded from the process of making decisions about their own learning.”  This suggests that students want new, non-traditional ways to learn in the classroom.   To support his viewpoint, Kohn wrote “You need to visit classrooms or schools that take a nontraditional approach to education, places where students are more likely to be absorbed and frequently delighted.”  Kids learn better if they are absorbed by the work they are doing.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

PLN 8: "What Teachers Really Want to tell Parents"

"What Teachers Really Want to tell Parents"
By: Ron Clark

Summary:
Ron Clark’s “What Teachers Really Want to tell Parents” describes how teachers are feeling threatened as parents’ protectiveness of their kids grow.  Clark states a starling fact that the average educator teaches only 4.5 years, and many of them say that dealing with parents is one reason they quit.  As a teacher himself, Clark lists ten things teachers want parents to know.  The list includes: teachers are educators, not nannies, trust the teachers, and stop making excuses for the child so they can learn to be successful.  The next set of things He also wants the parents to help the teacher instead of prosecuting them, do not complain about bad grades because the teachers that give low grades often are the better teachers, teachers and staff are living of fear of what the parents could do to them, and teachers want the parents to deal with negative situations in a professional manner. Clark is trying to raise parents awareness “…to trust us, support us, and work with the system.”  Teachers are becoming more threatened due to parents’ protectiveness and Clark wants parents to change their behavior.

Summary Response:

Ron Clark’s “What Teachers Really Want to tell Parents” explains that parents are becoming too over protective of their child and teachers are feeling threatened by the parents.  In the article, Clark gives an example of a child that was cheating on a test, and the parents claimed the teacher was labelling the child as a criminal.  Clark writes “…principals all across the country are telling me that more and more lawyers are accompanying parents for school meetings dealing with their children.”  This shows that parents are looking for better grades but when a child is accused of getting a bad grade in a class, they blame the teacher even if the grade was appropriate.  Another example Clark citied was when a teacher tried to help get a red mark off the side of a student’s face, but it was still there when he got home.  The parents called the media, and the teacher lost her job for something so trivial.  Just think, if a teacher could get his or her life ruined from something so trivial, then could they be fired for any reason?  Clark is also a teacher and suggests parents are immature, and tells them to deal with this in a professional manner and not just jump to conclusions.  Teachers are being threatened so much due to parents over protectiveness of their child that mean good teachers are quitting.  This trend threatens the quality of education.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

PLN 6 Redo:

PLN 6 Redo:
Amanda Ripley "The Case Against High-School Sports"

 
Summary:

Amanda Ripley’s “The Case Against High-School Sports” describes how students are being distracted by school sports.  Ripley provides an example of a test of critical thinking in math, as proof of why the United States ranks 31st because students are more focused on sports than they are on education.  Ripley questions the role of schools being involved with organized sports and the lack of emphasis on academics. Ripley explains the reason why South Korea, Shanghai, and Hong Kong are ranked the highest on the test is because these countries have a strong focus on academics.  Schools that are failing in education have tried multiple ideas to get education back up on the top priorities, such as getting rid of all sports.  Schools have multiple sports, and these sports are affecting student’s ability to learn.




Response:

    Amanda Ripley’s “The Case Against High-School Sports” elucidates that schools are edging students to play sports and not focus on education, in some cases becoming bad enough that schools need to find ways to switch a student’s focus.  The author explains that she is worried about the imbalance of schools’ emphasis on sports and academics, where they put sports first and academics later.  Ripley cited two schools that were trying to make changes by eliminating sports (Premont High School in Texas and Spelman College in Georgia).  Premont shut down all sports so their students would focus more on education, and Spelman College cut sports completely and instead put $1 million into a fitness program for the students.   Premont’s plan was a success, with 80% of students passing their classes instead of the previous year’s 50% of students passing, proving that cutting sports is a good way of changing a student’s focus.  Spelman College students lost weight because the fitness program benefited the full student body instead of just 80 athletes.  More schools need to figure out how to make education the primary focus of schools, even if it requires a major change in school sports.

PLN 7 Redo:

PLN 7 Redo:
Dr. Michael Wesch "Web 2.0...The Machine is us/ing us"


Summary:

Michael Wesch’s “Web 2.0…The Machine is us/ing us” educates how computers and the Web 2.0 are starting to use people once they post images and other comments on the internet.  The video starts out with an explanation of how using hand writing is not a very good form of expressing oneself.  Michael Wesch then illustrates multiple web applications, including websites, HTML formats, and Google to explain that people are growing more accustomed to the Web 2.0.  Wesch explains that users are teaching the “machine,” and as the machine starts to learn, it begins to “use” the user instead.  Throughout the video, Wesch portrays people are teaching the “machine” and the machine is growing smarter.



Summary Response:

Dr. Michael Wesch’s “Web 2.0…The Machine is us/ing us” demonstrates the use of the Web 2.0 and portrays a very negative effect on people by making them addicted to the internet.  Wesch expresses his dislike of the Web 2.0 because the web or “machine” is growing stronger as more and more people use it.  An example is when the video explains that over 100 billion people click on webpages every day, and this can lead to procrastination of homework or important work.  Also people can post things on the internet like pictures, videos, or comments, and once these are posted, people cannot get them back; this can harm someone’s reputation and can also affect their occupation.  The video ends when the writer transcribes a comment saying “We need to rethink ourselves.”  Wesch means that people should rethink their privacy, what they do online, and that they should be aware that the internet can be untrustworthy because people can post things that are based off other webpages.  The idea of the video is that people should stop trying to post immoral pictures or comments on the internet because those posts can end up negatively affecting the user.

Thursday, October 31, 2013

PLN 1: Speech

PLN 1:


Summary:

Dr. Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” illuminates the fact that students of college, high school, and middle school are not incorporating modern technology in class and are instead using it for personal reasons. Dr. Wesch uses multiple creative ideas by having students write on walls or create signs explaining multiple pieces of information to us.  His main idea is that college students are not able to learn well if they are not able to see the content on the board because of the size of the classroom. Dr. Wesch suggests the United States educational system need to rethink how to better suit technology to kid’s needs.

Summary Response:

Doctor Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” correctly depicts that technology is a harmful force to learning because students are not focusing on their homework. Yes, students can listen to music and work, but the music distracts them and they are not really putting any thought into the homework they are doing. If kids are able to use technology freely, what is stopping them from going to Facebook without the teacher knowing it? Dr. Wesch is completely right by saying that technology is hurting learning, but why can’t it monitor what kids are doing in the classroom all the time? There are programs out there that can be put on teacher and student computers so teachers can make sure students are doing work if they are connected to the internet. This way kids can stay on task and help improve the U.S’s world ranking in education.


Wednesday, October 30, 2013

PLN 7: "Web 2.0...The Machine is us/ing us"

"Web 2.0...The Machine is us/ing us"
Dr. Michael Wesch


Summary:
Michael Wesch’s “Web 2.0…The Machine is us/ing us” educates how computers and the Web 2.0 are starting to use people once they post images and other comments on the internet.  The video starts out with an explanation of how using hand writing is not a very good form of expressing oneself.  Michael Wesch then illustrates multiple web applications, including websites, HTML formats, and Google to explain that people are growing more accustomed to the Web 2.0.  Wesch explains that users are teaching the “machine,” and as the machine starts to learn, it begins to “use” the user instead.  Throughout the video, Wesch portrays people are teaching the “machine” and the machine is growing smarter.


Summary Response:
Dr. Michael Wesch’s “Web 2.0…The Machine is us/ing us” demonstrates the use of the Web 2.0 and portrays a very negative effect on people by making them addicted to the internet.  Wesch expresses his dislike of the Web 2.0 because the web or “machine” is growing stronger as more and more people use it.  An example is when the video explains that over 100 billion people click on webpages every day.  Also people can post things on the internet like pictures, videos, or comments, and once these are posted, people cannot get them back.  The video ends when the writer transcribes a comment saying “We need to rethink ourselves.”  Wesch means that people should rethink their privacy, what they do online, and that they should be aware that the internet can be untrustworthy because people can post things that are based off other webpages.  The idea of the video is that people should stop trying to post immoral pictures or comments on the internet because those posts can end up negatively affecting the user.


                                                                                                                                                

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

PLN 6: "The Case Against High-School Sports"

"The Case Against High-School Sports"
Amanda Ripley

Summary:


In Amanda Ripley’s “The Case Against High-School Sports” describes how high school (and college) sports are a big deal in the United States of America.  Ripley provides an example on a test of critical thinking, in math, is the reason why the United States ranks 31st because students are more focused on sports than they are on education.  Ripley questions the role of schools being involved with organized sports and the lack of emphasis on academics. Ripley explains the reason why South Korea, Shanghai, and Hong Kong are ranked the highest on the test is because these countries have a strong focus on academics.  Schools that are failing in education have tried multiple ideas to get education back up on the top priorities, such as, getting rid of all sports.  Schools have multiple sports, and these sports are affecting students ability to learn.



Response:


    Amanda Ripley’s “The Case Against High-School Sports”  elucidates that schools are edging students to play sports and not focus on education, which can create a bad future for students.  The author explains that she is worried about the imbalance of schools emphasis on sports and academics, where they put sports first and academics later.  Ripley cited two schools that were trying to make changes by eliminating sports (Premont High School in Texas and Spelman College in Georgia).  Premont shut down all sports so their students would focus more on education, and Spelman College cut sports completely and instead put $1 million into a fitness program for the students.   Premont’s plan was a success, with 80% of students passing their classes instead of the previous year’s 50% of students passing.  Spelman College students lost weight because the fitness program benefited the full student body instead of just 80 athletes.  More schools need to figure out how to balance out education with sports.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

What Could you do with $20,000: Speech

What Could you do with $20,000
Speech by: Blake Boles


Summary:

In “What Could you do with $20,000”, Blake Boles proposes that college age students might not need to go to college to be successful.  He explains that people who want to become doctors, lawyers, and scientists need to go to college.  Anyone else should stop and think about what they can do with $20,000 dollars because if the students don’t, they might find themselves under employed with a bachelor’s degree that can’t be used.  Boles two main ideas throughout the speech is that students should start learning self-teaching to gain knowledge and that they can get jobs quicker if they prove themselves during internships.


Summary Response:

                In Blake Boles “What Could you do with $20,000” speech, he explicates to the world that ordinary people do not need to go to college because as more people get more college degrees, the degrees start to decrease in value.  How does getting a college degree make a person stand apart from all the other college graduates in the world?  Boles delves into the world of self-knowledge, a form of learning where one teaches themself instead of having to sit in a classroom to get the needed education.  This idea of self-edification is supported by Dr. Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” opinion that students are not getting a good education if they are spending most of their time on social media or sitting at the back corner of 150-student class.  Boles explains that if a student takes a few thousand dollars, they could travel across the globe, visiting old and just developing countries to expand their knowledge outside the country they live in.  Boles gives another example that the money can be used to buy technology to expand computer knowledge.  In the end, he compares people who don’t go to college to Steve Jobs, a Harvard drop out, who later became a very successful entrepreneur and was extremely successful in life.  Boles’ argument is a very creative idea, and gets people thinking how to best spend the college savings.








Wednesday, October 9, 2013

PLN 5: "Footsteps in the Digital Age" by Will Richardson

Summary:

Will Richardson’s “Footsteps in the Digital Age” suggests that a new world for learning was created by the worldwide web.  Young adults are posting things on the web that leave a “Digital Footprint.”  This digital footprint is visible by being googled or being on Facebook and can be bad or good.  Richardson says the worldwide web is creating opportunities for kids to “learn deeply and continually” and lead the adults into the digital age.  One concern Richardson spoke of is that students need to be educated about who they interact with and what they post online, and also need to balance study time with social time.  Students can learn through the worldwide web to excel in life.

Summary Response:


Will Richardson’s “Footsteps in the Digital Age” explicates that students today have the potential to do their own learning, which will help them in the future.  This new world of the internet lets kids learn and leave their own footprints.  These footprints are a “double-edged sword” because they can be bad or good depending on what is visible to colleges and businesses that look up someone’s name to see what a person is like based off what they see on Facebook or Twitter.  Kids need to learn that these footprints are permanent and are unable to be deleted once posted.  Educators need to understand that networking or sharing is an axiological building block for students.  Students need to learn that when they become part of a website, they need to have a diverse network and be careful with whom they interact.  This post connects with Dr. Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” which suggests students are using the internet inappropriately during class time when they can be taking advantage of the learning opportunities the internet creates.  Richardson makes a strong case that the internet presents teens with a great opportunity to learn on their own.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

PLN 4: Redo


PLN 4: What Could you do with $20,000"

What Could you do with $20,000
Speech by: Blake Boles


Summary:

 

In “What Could you do with $20,000”, Blake Boles proposes that college age students might not need to go to college to be successful.  He explains that people who want to become doctors, lawyers, and scientists need to go to college.  Anyone else should stop and think about what they can do with $20,000 dollars because if the students don’t, they might find themselves under employed with a bachelor’s degree that can’t be used.  Boles uses a variety of thoughts in his speech to suggest that money invested in college might not be a good choice and there are alternatives to gain knowledge and experience.

 

Summary Response:

 

                In Blake Boles “What Could you do with $20,000” speech, he explicates to the world that ordinary people do not need to go to college because as more people get more college degrees, the degrees decrease in value which means the money spent on college may not be a wise investment.  How does getting a college degree make a person stand apart from all the other college graduates in the world? Boles offers some alternatives.  He delves into the world of self-knowledge, a form of learning where one teaches themself instead of having to sit in a classroom to get the needed education.  This idea of self-edification is supported by Dr. Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” opinion that students are not getting a good education if they are spending most of their time on social media or sitting at the back corner of 150-student class.  Boles explains that if a student takes a few thousand dollars, they could travel across the globe, visiting old and just developing countries to expand their knowledge outside the country they live in.  Boles gives another example that the money can be used to buy technology to expand computer knowledge.  In the end, he compares people who don’t go to college to Steve Jobs, a Harvard drop out, who later became a very successful entrepreneur and was extremely successful in life.  Boles’ argument is a very creative idea, and gets people thinking how to best spend the college savings.

PLN 1 Redo:


Summary:

Dr. Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” illuminates the fact that students of college, high school, and middle school are not incorporating modern technology in class and are instead using it for personal reasons. Dr. Wesch uses multiple creative ideas by having students write on walls or create signs explaining multiple pieces of information to us.  His main idea is that college students are not able to learn well if they are not able to see the content on the board because of the size of the classroom. Dr. Wesch suggests the United States educational system need to rethink how to better suit technology to kid’s needs.

Summary Response:

Doctor Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” correctly depicts that technology is a harmful force to learning because students are not focusing on their homework. Yes, students can listen to music and work, but the music distracts them and they are not really putting any thought into the homework they are doing. If kids are able to use technology freely, what is stopping them from going to Facebook without the teacher knowing it? Dr. Wesch is completely right by saying that technology is hurting learning, but why can’t it monitor what kids are doing in the classroom all the time? There are programs out there that can be put on teacher and student computers so teachers can make sure students are doing work if they are connected to the internet. This way kids can stay on task and help improve the U.S’s world ranking in education.

PLN 3: Redo


Bully by Lee Hirsch

 

Summary:

 

The documentary Bully by Lee Hirsch elucidates that bullying is not only hurting kids physically but mentally.  Each year kids are bullied to the point that they feel helpless.  They just want to feel like they exist to others.  This documentary gives some examples of kids being hurt.  Alex Libby, middle schooler, is bullied so much that he described that he did not know what to feel anymore.  Kelby, a kid who turns out to be lesbian, was called extremely bad names and eventually could not take it anymore.  Kelby thought people would change over time, but they did not, so her parents decided to pull her out of school.  The film shows that overall, school kids who are seen as different are becoming more and more prone to bullying, and are being hurt physically and emotionally.

 

Summary Response:


    The documentary Bully by Lee Hirsch explains that bullying is horrible in today’s schools, that school officials are not helping at all, and that people do not care if a child dies from bullying because they feel like they are not affected by one person’s death.  To some people, school officials appear like they actually are trying to do something; however, the reality is that the school teachers, principals, and administrators are not actually helping.  In the movie, the assistant principal of Alex Libby’s middle school helped to solve a fight between a bully and his victim.  The  assistant principal did not punish the bully, but instead gave the victim a strict talking to because of not complying with her rules and insulting the bully.  This shows that the principal is not actually helping solve the problem but is instead making the situation worse by not punishing the bully.  This makes the perpetrator think he can continue bullying without consequence.  The principal avoided the subject when Alex’s parents came in to talk with her, and they realized it.  Also Kirk Smalley, father of Ty Smalley who committed suicide due to bullying, said that his family were nobodies and people did not care if their child died.  He also said that if a politician's child died because of the same causes, there would be a law by tomorrow.  Hirsch’s view is correct that the school systems have to find a way to make a child’s day at school better because they do not want another death on their hands.  People should stand up against bulling and should care for another child’s safety even if their child is not affected by it.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

PLN 4: What Could you do with $20,000"

What Could you do with $20,000
Speech by: Blake Boles


Summary:

In “What Could you do with $20,000”, Blake Boles proposes that college age students might not need to go to college to be successful.  He explains that people who want to become doctors, lawyers, and scientists need to go to college.  Anyone else should stop and think about what they can do with $20,000 dollars because if the students don’t, they might find themselves under employed with a bachelor’s degree that can’t be used.  Boles two main ideas throughout the speech is that students should start learning self-teaching to gain knowledge and that they can get jobs quicker if they prove themselves during internships.


Summary Response:

                In Blake Boles “What Could you do with $20,000” speech, he explicates to the world that ordinary people do not need to go to college because as more people get more college degrees, the degrees start to decrease in value.  How does getting a college degree make a person stand apart from all the other college graduates in the world?  Boles delves into the world of self-knowledge, a form of learning where one teaches themself instead of having to sit in a classroom to get the needed education.  This idea of self-edification is supported by Dr. Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today” opinion that students are not getting a good education if they are spending most of their time on social media or sitting at the back corner of 150-student class.  Boles explains that if a student takes a few thousand dollars, they could travel across the globe, visiting old and just developing countries to expand their knowledge outside the country they live in.  Boles gives another example that the money can be used to buy technology to expand computer knowledge.  In the end, he compares people who don’t go to college to Steve Jobs, a Harvard drop out, who later became a very successful entrepreneur and was extremely successful in life.  Boles’ argument is a very creative idea, and gets people thinking how to best spend the college savings.

Saturday, September 14, 2013

PLN 2: Redo

Alison Gopnik's "What's Wrong with the Teenage Mind"

Summary:


The article written by Alison Gopnik, “What’s Wrong with the Teenage Mind” suggests that teenagers are going into puberty sooner and are reaching adulthood later.  One main idea is that students are starting to overestimate rewards now, which might be related to changes in energy balance.  Kids are underestimating risks due to a safe lifestyle they live in their parents care.  The other big point seen in the article is that kids are not growing up the way kids used to, which creates less chances to learn basic skills.  Gopnik’s article tells that children are growing up sooner and are reaching maturity later.
 
Response:

Alison Gopnik’s, “What’s Wrong with the Teenage Mind” continuously stresses the opinion that teenagers are not who they used to be because kids are more stressed about being popular and don’t have the same chances to learn as kids used to.  Gopnik constantly presented her point of view that teenagers are worse than they should be by describing that their view of rewards are much higher than adults or kids, which means teens find rewards more appealing than other age groups.  Evidence to the fact is that when teens took a driving test with a fMRI-brain imaging device on them, the reward section of the brain lighted up more when the teen thought another teen was watching. Adults think teens want social rewards, like a new car or being popular at school.  The truth is that kids want respect from their parents, older siblings, and other adults. Another issue that came up is that parents want kids to excel in life.  About half a century ago, kids had internships at age seven, and now teens can’t get internships at age 17.  Why? The job owners want interns or job applicants who have more experience in the field, so teens cannot get ahead in life if the world simply will not let them. One last problem is that teens make mistakes, but that’s all about learning through them because that is how an average teenager is supposed to turn into a mature adult.  For example, kids may get bad grades or drive a car through a fence because they did something wrong, but they will learn from the experience.  According to Gopnik, studies show that human children are more reliant on adults than any other animal.  Is that really okay?  During teenage years, the body and mind go through puberty, and kids want to learn more things, which is a good thing.  Teens should go out and try new things and learn from them so they can mature sooner.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

PLN 3: Bully

Bully by Lee Hirsch

Summary:


The documentary Bully by Lee Hirsch elucidates that bullying is not only hurting kids physically but mentally.  Alex Libby, middle schooler, is bullied so much that he described that he did not know what to feel anymore.  Kelby, a kid who turns out to be lesbian, was called extremely bad names and eventually could not take it anymore.  Kelby thought people would change over time, but they did not, so her parents decided to pull her out of school.  The film shows that overall, school kids who are seen as different are becoming more and more prone to bullying, and are being hurt not only physically but emotionally.


Summary Response:

    The documentary Bully by Lee Hirsch explains that bullying is horrible in today’s schools, that school officials are not helping at all, and that people do not care if a child dies from bullying.  To some people, school officials appear like they actually are trying to do something; however, if you look underneath, you can see that the school teachers, principals, and administrators are not actually helping.  In the movie, the assistant principal of Alex Libby’s middle school helped to solve a fight between a bully and his victim.  The  assistant principal did not punish the bully, but instead gave the victim a strict talking to because of not complying with her rules and insulting the bully.  This shows that the principal is not actually helping solve the problem but is instead making the situation worse by not punishing the bully.  This makes the perpetrator think he can continue bullying without consequence.  The principal also avoided the subject when Alex’s parents came in to talk with her, and they realized it.  Also Kirk Smalley, father of Ty Smalley who committed suicide due to bullying, said that his family were nobodies and people did not care if their child died.  He also said that if a politician's child died because of the same causes, there would be a law by tomorrow.  Hirsch’s view is correct that the school systems have to find a way to make a child’s day at school better because they do not want another death on their hands.

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

PLN 2: "What's Wrong with the Teenage Mind" by Alison Gopnik

PLN 2: "What's Wrong with the Teenage Mind" by Alison Gopnik

Summary:

The article written by Alison Gopnik, “What’s Wrong with the Teenage Mind” suggests that teenagers are going into puberty sooner and are reaching adulthood later.  One main idea is that students are starting to overestimate rewards now, which might be related to changes in energy balance.  Kids are underestimating risks due to a safe lifestyle they live in their parents care.  The other big point seen in the article is that kids are not growing up the way kids used to, which creates less chances to learn basic skills.
 
Response:

Alison Gopnik’s, “What’s Wrong with the Teenage Mind” continuously stresses the opinion that teenagers are not who they used to be.  Gopnik constantly presented her point of view that teenagers are worse than they should be by describing that our view of rewards are much higher than adults or kids, which means teens find rewards more appealing than other age groups.  Evidence to the fact is that when teens took a driving test with a fMRI-brain imaging device on them, the reward section of the brain lighted up more when the teen thought another teen was watching. Adults think teens want social rewards, like a new car or being popular at school.  The truth is that kids want respect from their parents, older siblings, and other adults. Another issue that came up is that parents want kids to excel in life.  About half a century ago, kids had internships at age seven, and now teens can’t get internships at age 17.  Why? The job owners want interns or job applicants who have more experience in the field, so teens cannot get ahead in life if the world simply will not let them. One last problem is that teens make mistakes, but that’s all about learning through them because that is how an average teenager is supposed to turn into a mature adult.  For example, kids may get bad grades or drive a car through a fence because they did something wrong, but they will learn from the experience.  According to Gopnik, studies show that human children are more reliant on adults than any other animal.  Is that really okay?  During teenage years, the body and mind go through puberty, and kids want to learn more things, which is a good thing.  So why can’t teens go out and try new things and learn from them because kids are going through puberty sooner and growing into adults later.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Summary/Summary Response:

After Learning what a summary and a summary response is, students are tasked with creating a summary and summary response based on the video "A Vision of Students Today."  By: Michael Wesch.

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Why do I read/write/think?
  • What does “reading”* mean to you?
  • Why do we read?
  • What do you do when you read?
  • When you get confused with a piece of reading, what do you do?
  • When it comes to reading, what is hard for you to do?
  • How do you know when you are successful?
  • What is your role as a reader?
* replace reading with writing and thinking- this is assessed solely on your in-depth thinking